Travels With Voss – How Marketing Utilizes the Divine to sell the Mundane

YouTube LARPS involve the utilization of the most cynical methods methods imaginable by cross-platform marketers  to emotionally engage the viewer while distancing them increasingly from reality. The post below from Symzonia explores surrealist art in relation to the reflected realities that lie on the other side of our reality. Marketers reappropriate and subvert Fine art  and transmute the sublime into the mundane in the name of Mammon. The aim is to engage the viewer, keep him going around in ever decreasing circles, before he finally disappears into a rabbit-hole which is the blackest pit of all, Dante’s 4th circle, where hopefully all marketers will reside for eternity, being poked eternally by the rest of us. If we ever speak to another human being again, that is, after having our souls raped by these lowlives, whose moral justification is the Assassins Creed, of killing them with kindness. The kindness extends to endlessly poking YOU with endless volumes of spam Emails bringing you to other places you really don’t want to end up in, and pleas to interact in Facebook groups, where they mine your data, in order to have something to read in hell. Meanwhile, decent folk are kind of hoping they’ll choke on their own psychotic pills. Perhaps we would be better off hanging out with nobler creatures, but it would be a pity to lose one’s faith in the goodness of at least most of the people we interact with. They are not all actors  in the movie zombie apocalypse. They are the great big happy family that wants to sell you something, and all you need to give up in return is your soul. More info on the marketing Family here.

Voss ⌊Ι:Ι

If you have questions about this post, we’d be happy to answer them here.

via Hidden Identity: Musings on the Backside (Part IV)

 

Genius

Just in case you’re starting to get into that sloppy, Hallmark Christmas spirit, this should bring you to your senses. Charles Bukowski’s ‘The Genius of The Crowd’ is a bleak and brilliant insight into the darker sides of  human nature.

there is enough treachery, hatred, violence, absurdity in the average
human being to supply any given army on any given day

and the best at murder are those who preach against it
and the best at hate are those who preach love
and the best at war finally are those who preach peace

those who preach god, need god
those who preach peace do not have peace
those who preach peace do not have love

beware the preachers
beware the knowers
beware those who are always reading books
beware those who either detest poverty
or are proud of it
beware those quick to praise
for they need praise in return
beware those who are quick to censor
they are afraid of what they do not know
beware those who seek constant crowds for
they are nothing alone
beware the average man the average woman
beware their love, their love is average
seeks average

but there is genius in their hatred
there is enough genius in their hatred to kill you
to kill anybody
not wanting solitude
not understanding solitude
they will attempt to destroy anything
that differs from their own
not being able to create art
they will not understand art
they will consider their failure as creators
only as a failure of the world
not being able to love fully
they will believe your love incomplete
and then they will hate you
and their hatred will be perfect

like a shining diamond
like a knife
like a mountain
like a tiger
like hemlock

their finest art

He was also one of the finest stage performers of his own work out there, and the gravelly rendition of the same piece included below is superbly delivered. His work is very accessible, so give it a listen even if you don’t usually like poetry, and if you’ve been good all year Santa might deliver another poetry gift later. Beats a tangerine in a sock, hands down.

Is his view a little warped, and the view presented by ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ closer to the message we should be clutching close to our warmed hearts at Xmas? I think  Bukowski may be closer to the truth, and the Depressive Realist  Hypothesis seems to have lots of support, even if ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ is more in line with the way retailers would like us to see the world at Christmas time, so they can cash in on our happiness. Genius.